Graduate Courses

MECH ENG 762

Computational Modeling of Circulatory System

Term 1 (September - December)

Course Description & Objectives

The circulatory system consists of the heart and a network of vessels that transport the blood. The heart consists of two pulsatile pumps in series and circulates blood through the vasculature. The vasculature consists of arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules and veins. The circulatory system also includes local circulation subsystems such as cerebral, pulmonary and renal circulations. Mechanics of the circulatory system may be studied from two biomechanical perspectives: solid mechanics of the blood vessels and fluid mechanics of the blood flow. The main objectives of the course are to learn basics of modeling of circulatory mechanics and getting familiar with the current challenges involved in the modeling process. Computational modeling of circulatory system presents formidable mathematical and computational challenges: modeling must incorporate motions of blood and vessel walls, complex biomechanics of the heart, a large network of the blood vessels with complicated geometries, persistent pulse-driven changes in flow and pressure, complicated exchanges happening in local circulatory subsystems and in some cases behavior of blood cells. After a brief review of circulatory physiology and fluid mechanics, the course will progress from modeling blood flow in small-scale steady/pulsatile to model large-scale or complex pulsatile flow. This course will cover various methods for modeling mechanics of the circulatory system and its subsystems. We will discuss the application of these concepts in the development of circulatory medical devices (e.g., stents, grafts, heart valves, trans-catheter valves and ventricular assist devices).

Significance

The main purpose of modeling circulatory mechanics is to study circulatory diseases. In vivo measurements are difficult, and even impossible in some cases. Non-invasive measurements are useful but do not always allow studying realistic conditions. Computational modeling of the circulatory system can fill this gap by playing major roles in uncovering causes of pathologies, in enabling prediction of effectiveness of interventions, in allowing systematic testing of possible clinical solutions, and in enabling personalization of interventions. Additionally, development and innovation of extra-corporal systems strongly rely on knowledge of the circulatory mechanics. Therefore, modeling is crucial for design and development of medical devices, and for evaluating of the hemodynamic effects of medical devices after implantation in the patient body

Undergraduate Courses

MECHENG 4BF3

Biofluid Mechanics

Term 1 (September - December)

Course Description & Objectives

“The essence of our life is ultimately not blood but the fluidity of blood. It is remarkable how readily we miss this point.” Mair Zamir

The circulatory system consists of the heart and a network of vessels that transport the blood. The heart consists of two pulsatile pumps in series and circulates blood through the vasculature. The vasculature consists of arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules and veins. The circulatory system also includes local circulation subsystems such as cerebral, pulmonary and renal circulations.

Blood flow is the life-line to each cell within our body. The main objective of the course is to learn basics of blood flow mechanics through the circulatory system and its subsystems. The field of Biofluid mechanics is broad and multidisciplinary covering motions of blood and vessel walls, complex biomechanics of the heart, a large network of the blood vessels with complicated geometries, persistent pulse-driven changes in flow and pressure and behavior of blood cells.

This course examines the physiology and mechanics of circulation, mechanobiology and the biomechanics of different components of the circulatory system, in-vivo and in-vitro techniques and their medical applications. This course covers normal circulatory system, diseases, and medical devices.

Significance

The extracorporeal systems, such as medical devices, should be tested to satisfy government regulations and biofluid is often essential in these tests. Thus, in the development of medical devices, biofluid mechanics plays important roles at all stages from design to evaluation of the hemodynamic effects of medical devices after implantation in the patient body. Moreover, biofluid mechanics plays major roles in uncovering causes of pathologies, in enabling prediction of effectiveness of interventions, in allowing systematic testing of possible clinical solutions, and in enabling personalization of interventions.

MECH ENG 2B03/2BA3

Mechanical Engineering Measurements

Term 2 (January - April)

Course Description & Objectives

Static and dynamic characteristics of instruments, statistical analysis of measurement errors, variable conversion elements and signal amplification. Metrology, measurement of strain and force, pressure, flow, temperature and power.

CARDIOVASCULAR RESEARCH GROUP

motamedz@mcmaster.ca 

Office: ABB-C 307

Tel: +1 905.525.9140 x 26997